Learn to Run

Our Learn to Run program is designed to have you running approximately 5 Km by the end of a nine week training period.

Learning to Run is easy when you do these three things:

  1. Train Regularly
  2. Wear Running Gear That Fits
  3. Seek Injury Prevention and Treatment

Train Regularly

Our recommended Learn to Run training program is outlined below:

Week 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min 3 min 4 min 6 min 8 min 10min 15min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min 3 min 4 min 6 min 8 min 10min 15min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min 3 min 4 min 6 min 8 min 10min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min 3 min 4 min 6 min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min 3 min 4 min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min 3 min 4 min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min 3 min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min 3 min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min 2 min
Walk 2 min 1 min 1 min
Run 1 min 1 min
Walk 2 min 1 min
Run 1 min
Walk 1 min
Run 1 min
Walk 1 min
Total 30min 24min 27min 32min 30min 28min 27min 33min 32m

Consistency = Success.  We recommend that you stick to the above schedule at least three times per week to build strength and endurance as you learn to run.

Wear Running Gear That Fits

Hey Cinderella, the shoe should fit!  Running is a high-impact sport, which means that you need high-impact gear. Shoes are the most important piece of equipment for running, and for women we recommend sports bras rated for maximum support.

We encourage new runners to visit one of our participating Running Retail Partners for help finding the right running shoes in the right fit.   Specialized running retailers have knowledgeable staff and great selections of running shoes to fit your needs.

Seek Injury Prevention and Treatment

Prevention is the best way to avoid injury. Stretching, rest, moderation, and appropriate shoes all help you enjoy injury-free running. However, you may have some soreness as you learn to run, and this is normal.  Some aches and pains are simply a result of trying a new activity (i.e., shin splints), whereas other injuries may require professional advice.

Please visit a health care professional to find out more about your injury. This could include a sports medicine physician, physiotherapist, massage therapist, or chiropractor

Whether  you choose to meet in a group or run on your own, we hope you find success with your fitness goals.

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